Coney Island
the original fun park at Coney Island in New York
the original fun park at Coney Island in New York
packed it up
To pack something up is to put it into containers so that it can be moved to another place.
Example: I want you to pack up your things and go!
For more meanings of the phrasal verb pack up, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: pack up
brought
Here brought is the past tense of the irregular verb bring. Follow the link below to find out more and listen to some examples.
more information: bring
built
Here built is the past tense of the irregular verb build. Follow the link below to find out more and listen to some examples.
more information: build
worked out
found a solution and decided what to do
Example: We worked out how to do things more efficiently.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb work out, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: work out
said
Here said is the past tense of the irregular verb say. Follow the link below to find out more and listen to some examples.
more information: say
came
Came is the past tense of the irregular verb come. Follow the link below to find out more and listen to some examples.
more information: come
R&R
rest and recreation
ended up
finish in a situation or place after a series of events
Example: You'll end up without a job if you're always late.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb end up, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: end up
led
Here led is the past tense of the irregular verb lead. Follow the link below to find out more and listen to some examples.
more information: lead
began
Began is the past tense of the irregular verb begin. Follow the link below to find out more and listen to some examples.
too
Notice that we spell too with two 'o's when it means 'excessive'
Example: English spelling is too hard.
Follow the link to find out more.
more information: to too
faces
the changing faces of Luna Park
the changing faces of Luna Park
kidsí
When talking about more than one, the possessive apostrophe is used after the 's'. Follow the link to find out more.
kids' smiling faces
kids' smiling faces
more information: possessive apostrophe
go on
continue
Example: I want to go on living.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb go on, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: go on