under the bonnet
Being under the bonnet means working on the engine of the car. It refers to the piece of metal called the hood or bonnet which covers the engine and which you have to lift and lean underneath to work on the engine.
looking under the bonnet
looking under the bonnet
behind the wheel
When you are behind the wheel of a vehicle, you are driving it.
He's behind the wheel.
He's behind the wheel.
Example: You shouldn't get behind the wheel if you've been drinking.
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fire it up
start it
Example: Let's fire up the engine and see if it works properly
no worries
The expression no worries is very common in Australia and is often used to say that you will do something without complaint.
Example: Can you drive me home?
No worries.
soaking up
absorbing; noticing things and becoming interested and involved
Example: My young son loves to go to the fair and soak up the atmosphere.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb soak up, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: soak up
follow in his footsteps
To follow in someone's footsteps means to do the same things as somebody else, especially somebody in your family.
Example: He's going to follow in his father's footsteps and be a doctor too.
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kept
Here kept is the past tense of the irregular verb keep. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: keep
bought
Here bought is the past tense of the irregular verb buy. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: buy
spruced it up
made it look much better
Example: We spruced up the house before we offered it for sale.
thought
Here thought is the past tense of the irregular verb think. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: think
give her a go
To give someone a go means to give them a chance, or an opportunity to try something.
Example: We should give the young players a go.
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overcome
Here overcome is the past participle of the irregular verb overcome. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: overcome
turned it into
To turn into is a phrasal verb that means to become or to change into something else.
Example: The tadpole turned into a frog.
burning the rubber
driving very fast
first-hand
directly; from your own experience or knowledge; from the source
Example: You need to experience something first-hand to fully understand it.
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fair bit
A fair bit means a large amount, or a significant amount.
Example: I've done afair bit of work today.
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won
Here won is the past tense of the irregular verb win. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: win
taken
Taken is the past participle of the irregular verb take. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: take
keep the pedal to the metal
keep trying very hard; continue going as fast as possible
Putting the pedal to the metal is stepping hard on a car's accelerator pedal
find out
discover; learn something that you didn't already know
Example: I've been trying to find out how to make this work for ages.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb find out, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: find out