I
I is a personal pronoun. It is the subjective case of the first person pronoun. This means that when you are referring to yourself as the subject of a sentence, you call yourself I.
Example: I am confused.
The objective case is me.
Example: You are confusing me.
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
much better
You can use the adverb much to intensify a comparative adjective such as better or the different type of comparative adjective the uses more, such as more relaxed.
Example: I'm feeling much better and much more relaxed.
For more about comparative adjectives, follow the link to our language library below.
more information: comparative adjectives
an
We use an instead of a before words that start with a vowel sound. Follow the link below to listen to some examples.
more information: a & an
she
She is the third person objective case feminine personal pronoun. This means that it's the pronoun used for a woman or girl when they are the subject of a sentence.
Example: She is very intelligent.
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
her
When a woman or girl is the object of a sentence, the objective case pronoun, her, is used.
Example: I don't like her.
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
her hand
Here her is a possessive adjective like my, your, his and its.
Example: Her car is in my way.
Follow the link below for more about possessive adjectives.
more information: possessive adjectives
which
Which is a relative pronoun used to refer to a thing previously mentioned, in this case Arkie's love of drawing.
Example: It's Akie's ability to paint which makes her parents proud.
Follow the link below to find out what a relative pronoun is.
more information: relative pronouns
my
My is a possessive adjective like her, your, his and its.
Example: My car is in her way.
Follow the link below for more about possessive adjectives.
more information: possessive adjectives
look after
To look after somone or something is to care for them and keep them in good condition.
Example: We need someone to look after the garden while we're on holidays.
think of
use your imagination or intelligence to create
Example: I can't think of a better example.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb think of, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: think of
myself
Here myself is the form of I or me used for emphasis.
Example: I don't think much of it myself.
It
It is a pronoun referring to what has just been mentioned.
you
Here you is the second person plural subjective case personal pronoun. This means that it is the pronoun used to refer to people in general when they are the subject of a sentence.
Example: You should all pay attention.
You has the same form for the singular second person that is the object of a sentence used when directly addressing a person.
Example: I'm talking to you.
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
we
We is the first person plural subjective case personal pronoun. This means that it is the pronoun used to refer to yourself and other people as the subject of a sentence.
Example: We try to be helpful.
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
us
Us is the first person plural objective case personal pronoun. This means that it is the pronoun used to refer to yourself and other people as the object of a sentence.
Example: We want you to help us.
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
your
Your is a possessive adjective like her, my, his and its.
Example: Your car is in my way.
Follow the link below for more about possessive adjectives.
more information: possessive adjectives
me
Me is the objective case of the first person personal pronoun I. This means that it's the form of I used as the object of a setence.
Example: Are you listening to me?
To find out more about personal pronouns, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: personal pronouns
more convoluted or complex
Notice that the comparative form of both these adjectives use more, but that more does not need to be repeated after and.
Example: more convoluted and more complex = more convoluted and complex
To find out about comparative adjectives, follow the link below.
more information: comparative adjectives