grow up
To grow up is to change from being a child to an adult.
Example: Children grow up quickly these days.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb grow up, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: grow up
planting those seeds
To plant or sow the seeds of something is to start a process that will become something important.
Example: The seeds of doubt were planted in my mind when I realised he could not have been at the scene of the crime on that day.
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said
Here said is the past tense of the irregular verb say. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: say
came
Came is the past tense of the irregular verb come. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: come
daily
The -ly suffix changes nouns for time such as day , week, month and year into adjectives or adverbs meaning ‘happening at intervals of’ or ‘per’.
Example: ‘I eat fruit daily’ is another way of saying ‘I eat fruit every day’.
Notice that the 'y' in day is changed to an 'i' when -ly is added:
Example: day
daily
For more about using the -ly suffix in this way, follow the link below.
more information: -ly suffix
stops me in my tracks
Something that stops you in your tracks makes you stop what you are doing because it is so unusual.
Example: I want to make a sculpture for the city that will stop people in their tracks.
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rain or shine
at any time; whatever happens; in any weather
Example: Rain or shine, I have to go to work every weekday.
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people's
Notice that the irregular plural people has an apostrophe and an s added to form the possessive. Follow the link below to find out more about using the possessive apostrophe.
more information: possessive apostrophe
for kicks
To do something for kicks is to do it only for the pleasure and excitement of it and not for other reasons.
Example: He steals cars just for kicks.
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