name's
This is the contracted form of name is.
come from
If you come from a place, you grew up there or were born there.
The main charater in Living English, Anne Lee, comes from Singapore.
The main charater in Living English, Anne Lee, comes from Singapore.
Example: She comes from Singapore.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb come from, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: come from
've been woodchopping
Have been woodchopping is the present perfect continuous tense, used to talk about an action that has begun in the past and is still continuing. Follow the link below for more.
more information: present perfect continuous tense
year's
Notice the use of the possessive apostrophe - this word is not a contraction of year is or the plural of year. Follow the link below for more about the possessive apostrophe.
more information: possessive apostrophe
it's
Here it's is the contracted form of it is. Follow the link below for more.
more information: its & it's
one
Here one is being used as a pronoun referring to the event in which he has just competed. One is only used as a pronoun for countable nouns.
Example: I can't find the photo - the one of the old house.
For uncountable nouns we use some in a positive context or any in a negative context.
Example: Have we got milk?
Yeah, there's some in the fridge.
Oh, I thought we didn't have any.
disciplines
A discipline is an area of study or a subject. We use the word discipline to talk about subject areas at university such as the discipline of science or art. In this case, David uses the word ‘discipline’ to talk about the five types of events he competes in. They require different skills and have different rules.
logging
Logging is the activity of cutting down trees for wood.
as well
in addition to; too
Example: They sell tea as well as coffee.
Click here for more idioms and common expressions.
it's
Here it's is the contracted form of it has. Follow the link below for more.
more information: its & it's
won
Here won is the past participle of the irregular verb win. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: win
too bad of a life
This means a bad life. He hasn't had a bad life, he's had a good life. Follow the link below to find out when we spell too with two 'o's.
more information: to too
got
Here got is the past participle of the irregular verb get. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: get
blessed
Blessed means hightly favoured or very fortunate. But when the word is used informally for emphasis in a phrase such as 'he knows how every blessed cent is spent' , the word is pronounced differently. Follow the link below and listen to the difference.
more information: blessed
practise
In Australia, when practise is ued as a verb it is spelled pratise with an 's' and when it's a noun it is spelled practice with a 'c'.
older
Adjectives of one syllable such as old add -er to make the comparative form. Follow the link below to find out more.
more information: comparative adjectives
put in
spend in terms of time and effort
Example: I put in a lot of work on this project.
For more meanings of the phrasal verb put in, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: put in
get out
gain from; derive
Example: What do you get out of your job?
For more meanings of the phrasal verb get out, follow the link below to our language library.
more information: get out
luckier
Many two syllable adjectives also have the -er comparative form. If they end in 'y', such as lucky, the 'y' is changed to an 'i' when the -er is added.
Example: lucky
luckier