Australia Network Logo
Episode 41 - Video
Episode 41 - Transcript
ANNE and SARAH, and STEVE and ANNE discuss the future.

SARAH
Well, you found your brother, you’ve ordered your wine, and tomorrow you’re going home.

ANNE
Yes, Sarah, thank you for everything.

SARAH
But you’ll come back, won’t you?

ANNE
Yes, if the wine sells well, I’ll be back soon. I feel as if I have a second family here.

SARAH
I’d love to come and see you in Singapore.

ANNE
Oh yes! I’ll show you around. And you must meet my parents. That’d be great.

SARAH
Well, if our business goes well, I’ll be able to afford it.

ANNE
There’s no ‘ifs’ about it. You’re a very good agent. I’m so happy you’re my buyer here.

STEVE
If you like, I’ll come to Singapore with Sarah.

ANNE
I’d like that very much. You can meet my parents too.

STEVE
Do you think they’ll like me?

ANNE
Of course they’ll like you. If I like you, they’ll like you.

SARAH
I think I’d better leave you two alone. Ring me if you need help with packing.

STEVE
I’ve only just met you. And now you’re leaving.

ANNE
But I’ll come back. If you want me to.

Episode 41 - Notes


1. HOPES FOR THE FUTURE
  One way of expressing a hope about the future is to use will and the question 'won’t you?'
SARAH
But you’ll come back, won’t you?
You’ll phone me, won’t you?
You’ll bring some food, won’t you?

We use this expression with other pronouns.
He’ll be alright, won’t he?
They’ll come back, won’t they?
I’ll win, won’t I?

To talk about things we really want to do we say 'I would love to'.
I would love to win a million dollars.
We usually contract I would to I'd.
I'd love to win a million dollars.
SARAH
I'd love to come and see you in Singapore.
Sometimes we use you must to mean 'you should'
Thailand is beautiful. You must go.
ANNE
Oh yes! I’ll show you around. And you must meet my parents.
   
2. IF
  We use if to talk about possibility. This use of if is called conditional.
If I blow air into the balloon, it will get bigger.
The thing that will cause the balloon to get bigger is blowing into it.
If I prick the balloon with a pin, it will burst.
The thing or condition that will cause the balloon to burst is being pricked with a pin
ANNE
Yes, if the wine sells well, I’ll be back soon.
  The wine selling well is the condition for Anne coming back.
Anne is not sure that the wine will sell well. If she was, she would use when, not if
When the wine sells, I’ll come back.
STEVE
If you like, I’ll come to Singapore with Sarah.
  The condition for Steve coming to Singapore is Anne liking it.
ANNE
Of course they’ll like you. If I like you, they’ll like you.
  The condition for Anne’s parents to like Steve is Anne liking him.
SARAH
Ring me if you need help with packing.
  The condition of Anne ringing Sarah is that she needs help packing.
It doesn’t really matter which way round we say this. You could say:
If you need help packing, ring me.
ANNE
But I’ll come back. If you want me to.
  The condition for Anne to come back is Steve wanting her to.
SARAH
Well, if our business goes well, I’ll be able to afford it.
 

The condition for Sarah to afford to go to Singapore is the business going well.

To say that she feels certain that Sarah will visit Singapore , Anne says:

ANNE
There’s no ‘ifs’ about it.
  Listen for a different use of if:
ANNE
I feel as if I have a second family here.
As if means like.
I feel as if I’ve been studying for too long.
   

Advertisement
Home and Away
Improve Your English
Advertisement
Explore Australia Network
TV Guide
Ways to Watch
News
Learning English
Sports Lounge
About Us
Australia Network Home
Help
Legals
© ABC 2014