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Episode 34 - Video
Episode 34 - Transcript
SARAH, ANNE and STEVE get pulled over for speeding.
A policeman is following them on a motorbike.

ANNE
What’s that?

STEVE
It’s the cops!
They pull over, and the policeman approaches.

POLICEMAN
Can I see your licence please?

STEVE
Here you are. I’m sorry officer, what’s the problem?

POLICEMAN
I’m afraid you were travelling at seventy kilometres per hour in a sixty kilometre zone. Also, I see you have a passenger in the back seat who was not wearing a seat belt. Do you know that you must wear a seat belt when you’re travelling in a vehicle, ma’am?

SARAH
I’m sorry. I forgot. You see officer, my friend here has been looking for her brother who she hasn’t seen for two years, and we’ve just discovered the address.

STEVE
We were driving there when you pulled us over.

POLICEMAN
Yes, well, you hear a lot of stories in this job. I haven’t heard that one before.

SARAH
But it’s true!

ANNE
I’m really sorry. It’s all my fault. I was only thinking about my brother, and now you’re in trouble.

STEVE
It’s okay Anne. It was my fault we were going too fast.

POLICEMAN
Look, just stick to the speed limit, okay?

STEVE
Thankyou officer. Thankyou so much.

POLICEMAN
But that’s no excuse for not wearing a seatbelt. Right now be off with you. I hope they find your brother, ma’am.

STEVE
Thanks officer.

Episode 34 - Notes


1. PAST CONTINUOUS
  Steve was travelling too fast.

Was travelling is a verb tense called past continuous. It describes a continuous action in the past.
POLICEMAN
I’m afraid you were travelling at seventy kilometres per hour in a sixty kilometre zone.
  Travelling is a continuous action, one that goes on for a time. And it is a past action, because Steve is not travelling now. He has stopped.
Listen for another continuous action that has stopped.
POLICEMAN
Also, I see you have a passenger in the back seat who was not wearing a seat belt.
We form the past continuous with was or were and the ing form of the verb.
They were driving too fast.
I was working too hard.
It was raining.

STEVE
We were driving there when you pulled us over.
We form the negative of the past continuous by saying not between was or were and the ing verb.
They were not driving too fast.
I was not working too hard.
It was not raining.

POLICEMAN
Also, I see you have a passenger in the back seat who was not wearing a seat belt.
   
2. WHILE, WHO & WHEN
  While, who and when are used to make complex sentences.
While means 'during the time’.
It’s used to link two ideas together.
You are on a bus.
You must have a ticket.
You must have a ticket while you are on a bus.
You are in a restaurant.
You mustn’t smoke.
You mustn’t smoke while you are in a restaurant.
When connects two actions which happened at the same time.
We were driving there.
You pulled us over.
We were driving there when you pulled us over.

STEVE
We were driving there when you pulled us over.
We were speeding.
You stopped us.
We were speeding when you stopped us.

POLICEMAN
Do you know that you must wear a seat belt when you’re travelling in a vehicle, ma’am?
We also link ideas with who.
My friend has been looking for her brother.
She hasn’t seen him for two years.
My friend has been looking for her brother who she hasn’t seen for two years.

SARAH
You see officer, my friend here has been looking for her brother who she hasn’t seen for two years
   
3. USING TENSES
  Listen to this long sentence from Sarah.
SARAH
I’m sorry. I forgot. You see officer, my friend here has been looking for her brother who she hasn’t seen for two years, and we’ve just discovered the address.
  The present perfect continuous tense ‘My friend here has been looking for her brother’ tells us that Anne was looking in the past, and is still looking now.
SARAH
You see officer, my friend here has been looking for her brother...
  ‘She hasn’t seen him’ shows that in all that time, Anne did not see her brother, and she still hasn’t seen him now.
SARAH
You see officer, my friend here has been looking for her brother who she hasn’t seen for two years.
   
 
 
’We’ve just discovered his address.’ is the present perfect tense. They discovered his address just a little while ago at the market.
SARAH
You see officer, my friend here has been looking for her brother who she hasn’t seen for two years, and we’ve just discovered the address.
   
 
   

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