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Episode 32 - Video
Episode 32 - Transcript
DAVID tells ANNE what he knows.
STEVE is looking at the photo.

STEVE
This is your brother?

ANNE
Yes

STEVE
I know this man!

ANNE
You know him!

STEVE
I’m sure it’s him. This is the man who works at the stall where I buy fruit.

ANNE
I knew it! I knew it was him! We must go there now!

STEVE
Hold on! Hold on! It’s ten o’clock at night. The Market’s closed. Let me have another look. How long since you’ve seen him?

ANNE
Two years.

STEVE
It’s him. I’m sure it’s him.
SARAH comes into the room.

SARAH
What’s going on?

ANNE
Steve says he knows my brother.

SARAH
What!

STEVE
Well I think so…

ANNE
He says David’s working at the Market.

STEVE
That’s right.

ANNE
My brother sells fruit for a living!

SARAH
Steve, are you sure?

STEVE
Yes. ANNE thinks she saw him.

SARAH
Well the Market’s are open tomorrow. Let’s find out.

ANNE
I can’t believe it. David, working at the Market.

Episode 32 - Notes


1. REPORTED SPEECH
We use says when we are talking about the singular third person.
Michelle says she doesn’t eat meat.
ANNE
Steve says he knows my brother.
  The first person is I or we.
We use say with the first person.
I say that meat is good for you.
We say that you should eat healthy foods.

We also use say with the second person, you.
You say that English is difficult.

The third person is anyone or anything else.
We use says with the third person.
She says that she’s sick.
He says that he can’t do it.
The doctor says to get some rest.

ANNE
He says David’s working at the Market.
  We don’t just use say or says to mean talking.
We use it to mean writing too.
The newspaper says that there was a terrible accident.
It says that the train leaves soon.

But when the third person is plural, we use say:
The newspapers say that there was a terrible accident.
They say that things are getting better.
The doctors say that smoking is bad for you.

If we ask a question we use say.
What does the newspaper say?
What does she say?
What does it say?
What do you say?
What did I say?
What did we say?

The past tense of say is said.
We use said with the first, third and second person.
I said it would be easy.
He said that he was tired.
You said that you would help.
The newspapers said that the war was over.

We use thinks or think in the same way as says or say
I think I understand.
She thinks meat is bad for you.

ANNE
My brother sells fruit for a living!

SARAH
Steve, are you sure?

STEVE
Yes. Anne thinks she saw him.
 
   
2. WHO OR THAT
We mostly use who when we are talking about people and always that if we’re talking about things.
I don’t like cars that are noisy.
I don’t like people who are noisy.
I like children who laugh.

You can say:
I don’t like people that are noisy.
I like children that laugh.

But with things we always use that.
I don’t like cars that are noisy.
I like houses that are old.

STEVE
This is the man who works at the stall where I buy fruit.
   
3. COMPLEX SENTENCES
  Words such as who, that and where are used to make complex sentences.
They link information like this.
This is the house.
I live there.

We can link these sentences with the word where.
This is the house where I live.
STEVE
This is the man who works at the stall where I buy fruit.
We can link more information with who.
This is the man.
He owns the house.
I live there.
This is the man who owns the house where I live.

STEVE
This is the man who works at the stall where I buy fruit.
   
4. AT, AS, FOR & IN
We mostly say that we work at a specific place.
David works at the market.
I work at the local TV station.

ANNE
I can’t believe it. David, working at the Market.
We mostly use in for the general type of work we do.
I work in the media.
Anne works in the wine industry.
David works in retail.

We say for to mean the organisation you are helping with your work.
He works for a bank.
I work for the government.
Anne works for an export business.

We use as to say what you job title is.
I work as a writer.
David works as a greengrocer.
Anne works as a wine importer.

   

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