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Episode 31 - Video
Episode 31 - Transcript
The family praise ANNE for her meal.
SARAH, her husband MARK, daughter Louise and brother STEVE are there. They are finishing their meal.

SARAH
That was delicious Anne.

ANNE
I’m glad you enjoyed it.

MARK
Yes, it was very tasty.

ANNE
If you went to Singapore you could have it every day.

SARAH
There you are, Mark, the advantages of travel.

STEVE
I thought it was absolutely superb.

ANNE
Thankyou, Steve. What did you think Louise?

LOUISE
Too hot!

ANNE
I’m sorry. That’s how we eat in Singapore.

STEVE
Do you want to play darts?

ANNE
What’s that?

STEVE
Come on, I’ll show you.

LOUISE
Can I play too?

SARAH
No Louise. Let Anne relax. She cooked dinner, so we’ll clean up.
In the games room, Steve shows Anne how to play darts.

STEVE
You have to hold it like this. Gently, like this. Look where you want the dart to go, and throw it, but not too hard.
ANNE throws her dart.

STEVE
That’s pretty good for a beginner.
ANNE smiles, but her mind is somewhere else.

STEVE
Anne, you seem sad again. What’s the matter?

ANNE
There’s something I haven’t told you...

Episode 31 - Notes


1. PRAISING A MEAL
If we like what we have eaten we can say:
That was nice.
That was very tasty.
That was delicious.

SARAH
That was delicious Anne.

ANNE
I’m glad you enjoyed it.

MARK
Yes, it was very tasty.
If you think it was more than delicious you can say:
That was absolutely superb.
STEVE
I thought it was absolutely superb.
It’s not polite to say you don’t like a meal if you are a guest.
But in a restaurant you can say to the people you are with:
That was awful.
That wasn’t very nice.

   
2. TO & TOO
  We use too to mean as well.
LOUISE
Can I play too?
  Or to mean more than

ANNE
Thankyou, Steve. What did you think Louise?

LOUISE
Too hot!
   
 
   
3. SO
  Sometimes we use so to mean because.

Listen to these sentences:
We won’t go out because it’s raining.
It’s raining, so we won’t go out.

I’ve got to go because it’s late
It’s late, so I’ve got to go.

I’ll buy this coat because I like it.
I like this coat, so I’ll buy it.

SARAH
Let Anne relax. She cooked dinner, so we’ll clean up.
   
4. INSTRUCTIONS
  When giving instructions to someone, we say you must or you have to.
Look at the instructions for playing ‘Pick up sticks’.

You have to hold the sticks firmly in your hand.
You have to let them fall.
You have to pick up as many sticks as you can.
You must be very careful.
You must not move any of the other sticks.
STEVE
You have to hold it like this.
  Giving commands or instructions is always to the second person, or you. But we can leave out the word you.
So the instructions for pick up sticks can just be:
Hold the sticks firmly in your hand.
Let them fall.
Pick them up without moving the others.

STEVE
Gently, like this. Look where you want the dart to go, and throw it, but not too hard.
  Written instructions often leave other words out, especially a and the.

Electric kettle
1. Fill with desired amount of water.
= put the amount of water you need into the kettle
2. Do not fill past maximum water level mark.
= don’t put too much water in
3. Plug kettle into power outlet.
= Plug the kettle into a power outlet
4. Turn power on.
= Turn the power on
5. Turn switch on kettle to ‘on’.
= Turn the switch on the kettle to ‘on’
   

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