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Episode 26 - Video
Episode 26 - Transcript
ANNE meets STEVE unexpectedly.

ANNE is trying to keep sight of the young man as she finishes buying her groceries. The young man turns away and she starts after him, but it is too hard to get through the crowd. She bumps into someone.

ANNE
Sorry.

ANNE
Steve!

STEVE
Fancy running into you here! Where are you off to in such a hurry?

ANNE
Oh, Nowhere… I, I thought I saw someone I know.

STEVE
Oh. Where?

ANNE
Oh, it’s okay. He’s gone now. I must’ve made a mistake.

STEVE
You got time for a coffee?

ANNE
Yeah,okay

STEVE
Yeah

STEVE
How about here?

ANNE
Fine.

STEVE
So what are you doing at the market?

ANNE
I’m cooking at your house on Friday, remember?

STEVE
Of course, Friday. That’ll be great.

ANNE
What about you? Do you come here often?
STEVE laughs

ANNE
What’s funny?

STEVE
When someone says, “Do you come here often”, it’s what we call a pick-up line. You know when someone’s trying…

ANNE
I know what a pick-up line is.

STEVE
Sorry. I come here every week to buy fruit. I like fresh fruit for work. What are we having for dinner?

ANNE
You’ll find out on Friday.

WAITER
What would you like?

STEVE
Cappuccino.

WAITER
Yep

STEVE
And a tea please

WAITER
Tea. No worries.

STEVE
Do you want me to take your shopping home? I can put it in the fridge for you.

ANNE
No, that’s okay, I have a fridge in my room at the hotel.

ANNE
The person you saw. Who did you think it was?

ANNE
It’s a long story. Maybe I’ll tell you later.

STEVE
On Friday.

ANNE
Maybe

Episode 26 - Notes


1. CHANCE ENCOUNTERS
  Listen again to how Steve and Anne meet:

ANNE
Sorry.

ANNE
Steve!

STEVE
Fancy running into you here! Where are you off to in such a hurry?
  Steve says “Fancy running into you here”.
To 'run into' someone means to meet them by chance.
Remember that run has the irregular past tense ran.
I ran into an old friend yesterday.
Where are you off to? means the same as 'where are you going?'
Where are you off to today?
I’m going to the shopping mall.

   
2. I THOUGHT...
We say I thought to talk about ideas we have that might change, or that we are not sure about.
I thought you had the keys.
I thought I phoned you yesterday.

ANNE
Oh, Nowhere… I, I thought I saw someone I know.
   
3. MORE SUGGESTIONS
  One way of suggesting to someone that you do something is to say Have you got time for…

Have you got time for a walk?
or
Have you got time to...?
Have you got time to talk?

Steve says this in a short and informal way without the word have:

STEVE
You got time for a coffee?
  Another way of making a suggestion is to say how about …?
How about? means ‘what do you think about?’ or ‘is this okay?’
How about going to the movies?
How about a cup of coffee?

STEVE
How about here?
Is it okay to sit here?
   
4. PLACES WITH AT & IN
We use at when we’re talking about a place such as an address, a type of business, or a place outside.
I’ll be at work today.
I saw him at the hospital yesterday.
I’ll meet you at school.
I saw her at the bus stop.
She lives at 23 Mitchell Street.

STEVE
So what are you doing at the market?

ANNE
I’m cooking at your house on Friday, remember?
In can only refer to something that is enclosed or has an inside and an outside.
I’m in the room.
I live in Australia.
I cook in the kitchen.

STEVE
Do you want me to take your shopping home? I can put it in the fridge for you.

ANNE
No, that’s okay, I have a fridge in my room at the hotel.
  NOTE: At can mean inside or outside. In can only mean inside.
I work at the hospital.
He is in the hospital having an operation.
 
   
5. PREPOSITIONS OF PLACE
  These words are called prepositions of place.
We use them to say where something is.
The apple is in the box
The apple is on the box
We can also say:
The apple is on top of the box.
The box is under the apple.
When the apple is not touching the box we say:
The apple is above the box.
The apple is over the box.
The box is beneath the apple.
The box is below the apple.
The apple is beside the box.
The box is beside the apple.
We use into and onto for actions:

He’s putting the apple into the box.

He’s putting the apple onto the box.

   

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