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Episode 24 - Video
Episode 24 - Transcript
ANNE and SARAH are tasting wines. The WINEMAKER, TIM, is explaining the different varieties.

TIM
These are our whites. Why don’t you try the Chardonnay first? It’s our best-selling wine.

SARAH
Lovely.

ANNE
Good fruit. Perhaps a little immature.

TIM
Yes, it’s made from some of our youngest vines. It’s our most popular white at the moment. Try this Riesling.

ANNE
Hmmm.

SARAH
It’s very pale isn’t it?

TIM
A lot of our customers are finding it very attractive.

ANNE
It’s a bit too dry for our market. I think we’ll leave that one. But I like the Chardonnay. I think we can sell that.

TIM
Excellent.

SARAH
Let’s try the reds.

TIM
Our reds are as good as any you’ll find around here.

ANNE
What have we got here?

TIM
This is our cabernet sauvignon. It’s very popular.

ANNE
Mmmm. A bit too much fruit at this stage. I understand it wasn’t a good year for cabernet in this district.

TIM
You know your wines, Miss Lee.

ANNE
I try to be prepared. What’s your best red?

TIM
This one. Our shiraz, and we think it’s world class.

SARAH
It’s a lovely colour, deepest red.

ANNE
What vintage is this?

TIM
It’s three years old now. It’ll drink well for years yet, but you can drink
it right now too.

ANNE
And what’s the price?

TIM
Well, it’s our most expensive wine at fifty dollars retail.

ANNE
I’ll think about it. It’s certainly got potential, but there are a lot of wines around in this class these days. You’ve got a lot of competition Tim!

TIM
That’s for sure. But we can work out a special price for you, if you’re interested.

ANNE
I’m definitely interested. This is very good. Sarah knows our requirements and pricing position, I’m sure you can work out something with her.

TIM
I’m sure we can.

Episode 24 - Notes


1. GIVING OPINIONS
  It is polite to say perhaps when giving an opinion or making suggestions.
Listen to the difference.
It’s time to go.
Perhaps it’s time to go.
You’re wrong about that.
Perhaps you’re wrong about that.

ANNE
Good fruit. Perhaps a little immature.
she means the wine is not ready to drink
When we give an opinion and want people to agree we say isn’t it?
It’s hot, isn’t it?
It’s funny, isn’t it?

SARAH
It’s very pale isn’t it?
she means the wine is pale in colour
Be careful. You only use isn’t it when the subject is it.
Instead of saying isn’t it with other subjects we say:
He’s funny isn’t he?
You’re late, aren’t you?
They run fast, don’t they?

Isn’t it is short for 'is it not?' which is the same as saying 'don’t you think?'.
This is a good movie, isn’t it?
This is a good movie, don’t you think?

We often say I think when we are giving our opinion.
I think the food here is excellent.
I think it’s a boring movie.

ANNE
I think we’ll leave that one.
a polite way of saying she will not buy it

But I like the Chardonnay.
I think
we can sell that.

   
   
2. USING THE WORD TOO

Another word we often use when giving opinions is too.
It’s too cold.

We use it for saying that something is more than we want.
The train is too crowded.
This tea is too sweet.
We often use too after much (much too) to mean 'even more than'.
The train is much too crowded.
This tea is much too sweet.

ANNE
It’s a bit too dry for our market.
the wine is not sweet
We use too before much (too much) to talk about amounts that can’t be counted.
This tea has too much sugar in it.
There’s too much noise.

ANNE
A bit too much fruit at this stage
the wine tastes too much like fruit juice

For things that can be counted we use many.
There are too many people on the train.

Notice that it’s spelled with two os - too
It has more than one o.
We also use too spelled like this to mean 'as well'
It has another meaning too.
I want to come too.
TIM
It’ll drink well for years yet, but you can drink it right now too.

it will taste good for many years and also tastes good now as well
  The number 2 is spelled two
All other uses of to are spelled to.
We’d like you to try the quiz.
 
   
3. SUPERLATIVES
We use adjectives in a different way to compare more than two things.

When we compare two things we add 'er' or say 'more' before the adjective.
This is big.
This is bigger.
 
More Information: comparatives
 


A cow is big



An elephant is bigger





A whale is the biggest of all animals

A Cow is big - An Elephant is bigger - A Whale is the biggest of all animals

One way to compare more than two things is to add 'est' to the adjective.
This is a big animal.
This is a bigger animal
This is the biggest animal.
ANNE
It's a lovely colour, deepest red

a very dark red

TIM
Yes, it's made from some of our youngest vines
Words that have one main sound or syllable have the est ending.
small (one syllable)
smallest
When a word has more than two main sounds or syllables, we don’t add an est sound to form the superlative.
Beautiful has three syllables.
Beau-ti-ful
The superlative of beautiful is the most beautiful.
She is the most beautiful woman in the class.
TIM
Well, it's our most expensive wine at fifty dollars retail.

TIM
It's our most popular white at the moment.

white wine
  There are two common superlatives that are different.
The superlative of good is best.
This is the best wine.
The superlative of bad is worst.
This is the worst wine.
ANNE
What's your best red?

red wine
Notice that we usually use the before superlatives.
This is the biggest animal.
She is the most beautiful woman in the class.

Or we use a possessive (your, our, their, its, my, someone’s or something’s)
That is your biggest problem.
Sam’s largest pet is his dog.

ANNE
What's your best red?

TIM
Yes, it's made from some of our youngest vines.

TIM
Well, it's our most expensive wine at fifty dollars retail.


TIM
It's our most popular white
at the moment
white wine
 
   
4. AS GOOD AS
  We use the expression as good as to say that things are the same as each other or that they are equally good.
My house is as good as yours.
(my house is equal to yours)
TIM
Our reds are as good as any you’ll find around here.
our red wines are equal to any in the area
We use as before and after adjectives to say that things are the same.
I’m as big as he is.
She’s as smart as you are.

   

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