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Episode 23 - Video
Episode 23 - Transcript
The Professor advises ANNE on what to do next.

GRAHAM
Here

ANNE
I don’t know what to do.

GRAHAM
I think you should go to the police.

ANNE
But he says I shouldn’t look for him.

GRAHAM
Yes, well he might have felt that way then. But a year’s a long time. If I were you, I’d report your brother missing.

ANNE
Should I tell my parents about the letter?

GRAHAM
Your poor parents, they must be so worried. I think you should tell them what you know.

ANNE
What if I can’t find him?

GRAHAM
Have faith. I’m sure you will. You know your brother. You’ll find him.

GRAHAM
I’ll show you out.
He shows her outside.

GRAHAM
Well, good luck Ms Lee.

ANNE
I don’t know what else to do.

GRAHAM
Why don’t you advertise in the newspaper? Put a photograph of your brother there. Somebody might recognise him.

ANNE
Good, I hadn’t thought of that.

GRAHAM
My advice is, never give up.

ANNE
Thankyou for your help.
She shakes his hand and walks away.

GRAHAM
When you find your brother – say hello to him for me.

ANNE
I will.
Episode 23 - Notes


1. GIVING ADVICE & MAKING SUGGESTIONS
Often we make a suggestion by asking a question like this:
Why don’t you move the bin to the rubbish instead of carrying the rubbish to the bin?
We can accept this sort of advice by saying:
Why don’t you use the internet to find out?
Good. I hadn’t thought of that.

GRAHAM
Why don’t you advertise in the newspaper? Put a photograph of your brother there. Somebody might recognise him.

ANNE
Good, I hadn’t thought of that.
Another way of giving advice is to first say If I were you…
Listen to the audio and repeat.
If I were you…
Then you give the advice
If I were you I would stop smoking.
GRAHAM
If I were you, I’d report your brother missing.
When making suggestions or telling someone what to do, it’s polite to say I think
I think you should go to the police.
An informal way of saying this is I reckon
I reckon you should go to the police.
When giving advice we usually say should or ought to.
I think you should go to the police.
I think you ought to go to the police.

GRAHAM
I think you should go to the police.
The opposite of should is should not or shouldn’t.
You shouldn’t smoke.
ANNE
But he says I shouldn’t look for him.
To ask for advice, you say should first.
Should I buy that car?
ANNE
Should I tell my parents about the letter?
 
   
2. HAVE TO, MUST & SHOULD HAVE
When there is only one choice we say have to or must.
You have to water the plant or it will die.
You must water the plant or it will die.

For things that are not necessary we say should.
You should fertilise plants to make them grow well.
We say should have for things we think would have been good to do in the past.
I should have turned the oven off!
We use it to express regret.
I should have studied more.
I should have stopped smoking years ago.

   
3. WOULD & WILL
We use will for things we intend to do or are going to do.
I will go on holiday next week.
 
 

Would is a form of will that we use for things we wish or imagine were going to happen.
I wish it would stop raining.
It would be good to be very rich.


Would is used in polite requests such as:
I would like a drink.

To make someone feel better about what is going to happen, we use the more definite will.
I’m sure everything will be all right.

GRAHAM
When you find your brother – say hello to him for me.

ANNE
I will.
 
   

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