Australia Network Logo
Episode 22 - Video
Episode 22 - Transcript
ANNE sees the Professor.
ANNE reads a sign 'Adelaide University' She enters the university grounds.
She walks down a corridor and sees a sign on a door 'Professor GRAHAM Cornish' She knocks on the door.

GRAHAM
I’m sorry to hear your brother’s gone missing, Miss Lee.

ANNE
We’re all so worried. I’ve come to Adelaide to look for him. How long did he study here?

GRAHAM
I’m not sure, er, two semesters.

ANNE
Did he get good grades?

GRAHAM
I’m afraid not. I don’t think computer science was the right direction for him.

ANNE
The investigator, Mr Barbour said you have a letter, from David.

GRAHAM
Ah, of course. It’s addressed to you. I told him I’d only give it to you in person.

DAVID
Dear Anne, Please don’t look for me. I need to be by myself. I can’t study any more. Tell mum and dad to forget about me and take care of themselves. You too. Look after yourself. I’m sorry. Love, your brother David.
ANNE puts the letter down. Tears fill her eyes.
GRAHAM holds out a box of tissues.

GRAHAM
Here

Episode 22 - Notes


1. LETTER WRITTING

When we write to someone we know, we usually begin by writing
Dear…
and then the name of the person you are writing to:
Dear Anne
You don’t need to use their formal title.

We finish the letter with:
Dear Anne
I’m having a good time.

Love...

and your name
Dear Anne
I’m having a good time.
Love,
David

But only use Love if you are close to the person you’re writing to.
You can just write your name if you’re not sure.
Dear Anne
I’m having a good time.

David
 
more information: Episode 18 - Letter Writing
   
2. PERSONAL PRONOUNS

Personal pronouns are words such as I, you, and they.
You use them to refer to yourself.
I am reading this.
Or to the person you’re talking to.
I hope you understand this.

Personal pronouns also refer to people and things we know or have just named.
Elvis Presley is dead. He died in 1979.

 
 

I, me, we and us are used for the first person:
We use them to talk about ourselves.
I enjoy learning English.
Listen carefully to me.
We want to help you.
Listen carefully to us.
DAVID
Dear Anne, Please don’t look for me. I need to be by myself. I can’t study any more.
  The pronoun for the second person is you.
It’s used to talk directly to other people.
You should listen carefully.
   

ANNE
The investigator, Mr Barbour said you have a letter, from David.

GRAHAM
Ah, of course. It’s addressed to you. I told him I’d only give it to you in person.
  He, she, they, him, her and them are third person pronouns we use for talking about other people.
He is clever.
She is smart.
They work hard.
I like him.
I believe her.
I don’t trust them.
ANNE
I’ve come to Adelaide to look for him. How long did he study here?
   
3. SUBJECT & OBJECT PRONOUNS
  Sentences usually have a subject and an object.
The subject usually comes first.
He came to look for him.
He is the subject of that sentence.
The subject of a sentence is the person or thing that does something, or performs the action.
He came to look for…..
The object of a sentence is the person or thing that is affected by the action.
He came to look for him.
 
 

Most pronouns have two forms - one we use as the subject of a sentence and the other we use as the object.
He is the subjective form and him is the objective form.
He helped him.
She is the subjective form.
She washed the dishes.
And her is its objective form
I helped her.
We is the subjective form
We bought a car.
And us is its objective form
It cost us a lot of money.
They is the subjective form.
They are noisy.
Its objective form is them.
I must tell them to be quiet.
I is the subjective form.
I take photos.
Me is its objective form.
That’s a photo of me.
 
   
4. REFLEXIVE PRONOUNS
  Reflexive pronouns are the self’ words such as yourself and myself.

We use reflexive pronouns when the subject of the sentence is the same as the object of the sentence.
We say:
I like myself.
and not
I like me. X
You is both the subject and object of this sentence:
You like yourself.
Here are some more examples.
My brother hurt himself.
Sarah drove herself home.
The cat licks itself.

When we’re talking about more than one person of thing, we use these plural forms.
They enjoyed themselves.
We enjoyed ourselves.

DAVID
Tell mum and dad to forget about me and take care of themselves.
 
   

Advertisement
Home and Away
Improve Your English
Advertisement
Explore Australia Network
TV Guide
Ways to Watch
News
Learning English
Sports Lounge
About Us
Australia Network Home
Help
Legals
© ABC 2014