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Episode 18 - Video
Episode 18 - Transcript
ANNE returns to the hotel, to find a message.
ANNE and STEVE return to the hotel courtyard.

STEVE
Did you have a good day?

ANNE
Very much. Thankyou for taking me. How about you?

STEVE
Of course.

ANNE
Not too boring? You must have been there a hundred times.

STEVE
Not since I was a kid. It was great.

ANNE
Hmmm. Do you like Chinese food?

STEVE
I love Chinese food.

ANNE
I’m going to cook a Chinese meal for you and your family.

STEVE
Really! That’ll be great. When?

ANNE
Friday?

STEVE
Fantastic. I’ll see you then.

ANNE
Yes, bye.

STEVE
Bye.
STEVE goes, pleased with his day. ANNE goes to collect her key from the CLERK, who doesn’t notice her. She coughs.

ANNE
Excuse me.

CLERK
I’m sorry Ms Lee. I didn’t see you.

ANNE
Could I have my key please?

CLERK
Certainly. Here you are. Oh, and there’s a message for you.
ANNE opens the message and reads it. It’s from JOHN the private
investigator.



JOHN’S NOTE
Dear Ms Lee

Please call my office. I have some news for you.

John Barbour
Private Investigator.
Episode 18 - Notes


1. Letter Writing
 

Formal letters to people you haven’t met begin with Dear
Dear .........

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

It always has a capital letter
Dear .........

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

If you don’t know the name of the person you are writing to, write Sir or Madam
Dear Sir or Madam

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

Remember to use capital letters.
Dear Sir or Madam

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

Use the formal title of the person you are writing to.
 
more information: formal titles - episode 2
 

Dear Mr Whittle

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

When you finish the letter you write Yours sincerely and your name, like this:
Dear Mr Whittle

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

Yours sincerely,
Anne Lee

It is the custom to write Yours faithfully if you don’t know who you are writing to.
 

Dear Sir or Madam

Please consider me for an interview.
I have excellent qualifications.

Yours faithfully,
Anne Lee
   
2. EXCUSE ME, SORRY & PARDON
We say excuse me to get someone’s attention:
Excuse me, do you know what time it is?
Excuse me, can we have the bill?

ANNE
Excuse me.

CLERK
I’m sorry Ms Lee. I didn’t see you.
 

We also say excuse me to apologise
Oh, excuse me. I spilled your drink.

Here are some other ways we apologise for little things.
Oh, pardon me. I spilled your drink.
Oh, sorry. I spilled your drink.


We reply like this:
Oh, sorry. I spilled your drink.
That’s alright.

or
Oh, sorry. I spilled your drink
That’s okay.

We also use pardon and sorry if we haven’t heard what someone has said and want them to say it again.
Listen to the difference.
pardon?
sorry?

If you don’t know the person very well use the more formal:
I beg your pardon?
   
3. GOINT TO / GUNNA
We say going to tell people what we will do in the future.
I’m going to study next year.
People say this quickly so it sounds like gunna:
I’m gunna study next year.
ANNE
I’m going to cook a Chinese meal for you and your family.
   
4. KIDS & TEENAGERS
A very common slang term for children is kids.
The kids go to bed at eight o’clock.

ANNE
You must have been there a hundred times.

STEVE
Not since I was a kid. It was great.
 

Babies who have just learnt to walk are called toddlers.
Things get more difficult with toddlers.

Older children from thirteen years old to nineteen years old are called teenagers.
Teenagers are very demanding.
   

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