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Episode 7 - Video
Episode 7 - Transcript
SARAH invites ANNE to meet her family.
SARAH and ANNE taste a sample
of wine
.

ANNE
Mmm. Itís very smooth. Good flavour too.

SARAH
It sells well in restaurants here. I think theseíll sell well in Singapore.

ANNE
The samples you sent me were very popular with our staff. You seem to understand our tastes in Singapore.

SARAH
Thankyou. Itís my job to know what my clients like.
ANNE seems distracted. SARAH observes her for a moment.

SARAH
So, are you enjoying the city?

ANNE
(unconvincingly)
Itís very nice.

SARAH
What are you going to do tomorrow?

ANNE
I donít know. Iíll probably stay in the hotel and relax.

SARAH
Why donít you come to lunch with us at home?

ANNE
Oh thankyou, but you have your family.

SARAH
Yes, and they want to meet you. Weíre going to have roast chicken Ė traditional Aussie food.

ANNE
Sounds good. Alright, Iíll come.

SARAH
Great.

ANNE
What time?

SARAH
We eat at about one-o-clock. So about twelve-thirty? Iíll show you the house.

ANNE
Okay. Thankyou

SARAH
Iíll get my brother to pick you up.

ANNE
No thatís okay. Iíll get a taxi.

SARAH
Alright then. Thatís settled!
Episode 7 - Notes


1. GOING TO
Going to is used for things you intend to do in the future. It is always followed by a verb.
We’re going to drive to the beach.
I’m going to do the shopping later.

SARAH
What are you going to do tomorrow?
We can use going to to talk about things we will do soon, or in a long time.
I’m going to work as a teacher when I finish my course.
SARAH
We’re going to have roast chicken
The phrase going to without a verb after it just means travelling somewhere.
I’m going to work now.
They’re going to the supermarket.

   
2. WILL
  Another word we use to talk about actions in the future is will.

We use will to talk about definite actions in the future.
I will see you tomorrow.
In this sentence, there is a definite arrangement to meet tomorrow.
This is called future tense. The auxiliary will goes between the subject and the verb.

I
(subject)

will
(auxiliary)

see
(verb)

you
(object)

tomorrow

There is no change with singular or plural subject.

He will see you tomorrow.
They will see you tomorrow.
The teachers will have a meeting on Friday.

Will is often contracted to 'll.
I will - I’ll
I'll
pay you tomorrow.

SARAH
I’ll show you the house.

SARAH
I’ll get my brother to pick you up.

ANNE
No that’s okay. I’ll get a taxi.
he will - he’ll
He'll
do it next week.
she will - she’ll
She'll
ring you tomorrow.
it will - it’ll
It'll
be alright.
you will - you’ll
You'll
have to work late.
we will - we’ll
We'll
have a party.
they will - they’ll
They'll
win the game.
these will - these'll
These'll be suitable.
SARAH
It sells well in restaurants here. I think these’ll sell well in Singapore.
that will - that'll
That'll be all.
   
3. SUGGESTIONS
Sarah says:
SARAH
Why don’t you come to lunch with us at home?
Sarah is inviting Anne to her house for lunch. The phrase Why don’t you is used to make a suggestion.
Why don’t you catch a bus?
Why don’t you come with me?
   
4. DAYS
Today is the day it is now.
Tomorrow is the day after today. If today is April 6, tomorrow is April 7
Yesterday is the day before today. If today is April 6, yesterday is April 5
The days of the week are:
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday are called weekdays. They are the days most people work.
Saturday and Sunday together are called the weekend.
Notice that all of the days of the week have a capital letter.
   
5. PREPOSITIONS OF TIME
 

on, at, in, this, next

When talking about the time or date:

For days we use on.
I’ll see you on Thursday.
For times we use at.
I’ll see you at 10 o’clock.
SARAH
We eat at about one-o-clock.
For months we use in
I’ll see you in November.
For times within a week, month or year we say this.
I’ll see you this week. (the week we are in now)
It must be finished this month. (the month we are in now)
We’ll do it this year. (the year we are in now)
For the time just beyond the present week, month or year, we use next.
I’ll see you next week. (the week after the week we are in now)
We’ll start planning that next month. (said in June to refer to July)
We’ll do it next year. (said in 2003 to refer to 2004)
If we want to say how far in the future the appointment is, we use in.
I’ll see you in ten minutes.
I’ll see you in two hours.
I’ll see you in a week.
I’ll see you in a month.

 
   

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