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Episode 2 - Video
Episode 2 - Transcript
Sarah and Mark take Anne to her hotel. She checks in.

ANNE
Thank you very much for picking me up.

SARAH
You’re very welcome. Will you be alright here?

ANNE
Thanks. I’ll be fine. And thankyou Mark, for helping with my
heavy bags.

MARK
Don’t mention it.

SARAH
Alright then. Nice to meet you finally. I’ll ring you tomorrow.

ANNE
Nice to meet you too.

SARAH
Goodbye.

CLERK
Good morning. Would you like to check in?

ANNE
Yes please.

CLERK
And your name?

ANNE
Anne Lee.

CLERK
Ah yes. Could you just fill this out please?
How long will you be staying?

ANNE
Two weeks.

CLERK
Are you here on business?

ANNE
Mainly business.

CLERK
Will you need a hire car?

ANNE
No thankyou.

CLERK
And will you need a map of the city?

ANNE
Maybe later.

CLERK
Will you want a newspaper in the morning?

ANNE
No thankyou.

CLERK
OK. And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

ANNE
Credit card.

CLERK
Thankyou. Here’s your key. It’s room 309. Enjoy your stay Ms Lee.

ANNE
Thankyou. I hope I will.
Episode 2 - Notes


1. SAYING THANKYOU
The most common way of thanking someone is to say:
Thankyou
This is said as one word.

To add emphasis we can say:
Thankyou very much.
Or:
Thankyou so much.

A more informal word is:
Thanks
Some polite replies to thankyou are:
Thankyou
Don’t mention it.
Or:
Thanks
You’re welcome.
Some more casual or informal replies to thankyou or thanks are:
Thankyou
That’s okay

Thankyou very much
That’s fine

Thanks
No worries.

ANNE
Thank you very much for picking me up.

SARAH
You’re very welcome. Will you be alright here?

ANNE
Thanks. I’ll be fine. And thankyou Mark, for helping with my heavy bags.

MARK
Don’t mention it.


2. SAYING GOODBYE
When we leave someone we usually say:
Goodbye

Or more informally:
Bye

When leaving a friend or someone we will see again we might say:
See you later

or just
seeya
SARAH
Goodbye.
   
3. THE FUTURE TENSE
  The future tense is used to talk about what will happen in the future, after the present.

The word will is used to show that we are talking about the future.
Will is put before the verb.
Here are three sentences:

Simple Present Tense:
I go to the city. (I go there every day)

Present Continuous Tense:
I am going to the city. (I am going there now)

Future Tense:
I will go to the city. (at some later time)

Notice how the word will comes before the verb go.

To make this into a question, change the order of the subject I and will.
Will I go to the city?

CLERK
Will you need a hire car?

CLERK
Will you want a newspaper in the morning?
In speech, the word will is often contracted.

I will becomes I’ll.
I’ll go to the city.

He will becomes he’ll.
He’ll get into trouble.

We will becomes we’ll
We’ll go out tonight

You will becomes you’ll.
You’ll go to the city.

They will becomes they’ll.
They’ll lose all their money.
But in questions, will is pronounced fully.
Will you go to the city?
SARAH
Will you be alright here?

ANNE
Thanks. I’ll be fine.
   
4. PAYING
When buying something, the clerk, or sales assistant may ask:
How will you be paying?

Or:
How would you like to pay for that?
  You can say in reply:
Credit Card How will you be paying?
I’d like to pay by credit card.
 
  Credit CardHow will you be paying?
By Eftpos.

  ChequeHow will you be paying?
By cheque.

 
  CashHow will you be paying?
In cash.
CLERK
And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

ANNE
Credit card.
   
5. FORMAL TITLES
When we speak to someone formally, especially when we first meet them, we usually use their formal title.

This is done by saying:
Mister (written Mr) for men.
Missus (written Mrs) for married women.
Miss for unmarried women.
Or Ms for women where you don’t know if they are married.

May women in Western countries prefer to be called Ms, and it is a good idea to use this term if not sure.

We say the person’s title, followed by their family name. In English this is also called their surname. The surname is also sometimes called the person’s last name, because it is written last.

So Brenton Whittle’s formal title is:
Mr Whittle.

Michelle Crowden’s formal title is either:
Mrs Crowden (if she is married)
Miss Crowden (if she isn’t married)
Or
Ms Crowden (in either case).

When you know someone better, or in an informal situation, you would use their first name. In Western countries, this is also often called their Christian name.

So Brenton Whittle’s first name, or Christian name, is Brenton.

We never put Mr, Mrs or Ms before first names, only before surnames.

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