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Episode 1 - Video
Episode 1 - Transcript
Anne, a wine dealer from Singapore, arrives at Adelaide Airport and meets her local buyer, Sarah.

Anne walks out with the other passengers...

ANNE
Excuse me...

SARAH
Anne Lee?

ANNE
Yes. Hello

SARAH
Iím Sarah Taylor. Iím your new local buyer. Pleased to meet you.
(they shake hands)

ANNE
Itís very kind of you to meet me.

SARAH
Oh. Sorry. This is my husband, Mark.

MARK
Good morning. How are you?

ANNE
Very well thankyou.

MARK
How was your flight?

ANNE
Actually, Iím a bit tired. It was a very long flight.

SARAH
Letís get your bags.

The three watch as the bags go around. Anne points.

ANNE
Thatís mine there! The red one.

MARK
Itís heavy!

ANNE
Sorry.

SARAH
Donít worry. Markís strong Ė arenít you dear?

MARK
No worries.

SARAH
Come on. Letís go to the hotel.

They leave the airport.
Episode 1 - Notes


1. GREETINGS
There are many different ways of meeting people.
The most common word is: Hello.
This can be used in any situation.
A more informal word is: Hi!
Only use hi for friends or informal situations.
SARAH
Anne Lee?

ANNE
Yes. Hello
We also use: How are you?
or How are you going?

And you can say:
Good morning (before 12 midday)
Good afternoon (12-6pm)
Good day (anytime)
Good evening (after 6pm)
MARK
Good morning. How are you?

  Replies
A reply to hello can be hello.
Hello Peta
Hello
Trevor
A reply to Hi can be Hi.
Hi Peta
Hi Trevor


A reply to Good morning can be Good morning.
Good morning Peta.
Good morning Trevor.

A reply to How are you? can be Good thanks
How are you?
Good thanks.


Another repy to this is fine thanks
How are you?
Fine thanks.


or informally Not bad
How are you?
Not bad.


and more formally Very well thank you.
How are you?
Very well thank you.
MARK
Good morning. How are you?

ANNE
Very well thankyou.
 
2. INTRODUCTIONS
If the person you meet doesn’t know your name, you say it:
Hello, I’m
......... (your name).
Or
Good morning. My name is
......... (your name).
If you are introducing someone, you can say:
This is
......(person’s name).
This is
Sue Smith.

Or
I’d like you to meet
Sue Smith.
Often we give more information when introducing someone.
This is my office manager
, Sue Smith.

Or This is my brother, Phillip Taylor.
A common reply is:
Pleased to meet you.
Or
Nice to meet you.

SARAH
I’m Sarah Taylor. I’m your new local buyer. Pleased to meet you.
(they shake hands)

ANNE

It’s very kind of you to meet me.

SARAH
Oh. Sorry. This is my husband, Mark.
 
3. SIMPLE SENTENCES
  English is made up of sentences.

A sentence always starts with a capital letter, and ends with a fullstop, question mark or exclamation mark.

Here is a simple sentence:
I’m Sarah Taylor.


This is made up of three parts:
The subject I.
The verb am.
The object Sarah Taylor.

Look at this sentence.
She likes wine.
The subject is she.
The verb is likes.
The object is wine.
The subject of a sentence is the person or thing that performs the action.
In the sentence Lions eat meat. the subject is lions.
The object of a sentence is the person or thing that is affected by the action.
In the sentence Lions eat meat.the object is meat.


Try the quiz to if you can tell which word is the subject or object.
 
4. PERSONAL PRONOUNS
  Personal Pronouns are words which stand for people.
Subject pronouns are the subjects of sentences.
They are:
I    he   she   it   you   we   they
Subject pronouns usually go before verbs.
For example:
I like frogs.
Possessive adjectives go before nouns to show who or what owns something.
For example:
This is my hat.
That is your hat.

Possessive adjectives are:
my    his    her   its    your    our   their
SARAH
This is my husband, Mark.
Possessive pronouns can be used instead of the noun:
For example: This is my hat.
This is mine.
That is your hat.
That is yours.

Possessive pronouns are:
mine   his   hers   yours   ours   theirs
ANNE
That’s mine there! The red one.
 
 5. THIS AND THAT
This can be used to refer to objects or people right next to the speaker.
This
is my wife, Mary.
This
is my watch.
SARAH
This is my husband, Mark.
That is used to refer to objects or people further away.
That is the man you want to speak to, over there.
That
is the post office, across the road.
ANNE
That’s mine there! The red one.
 
 6. ADJECTIVES
Adjectives describe things or people.
Words such as light, heavy and strong are adjectives.
They usually go before nouns, or after verbs.

For example:
Anne’s bag is heavy.
It’s a heavy bag.

The hat is red.
It’s a red hat.

   

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