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Friday, 23 January  2009  Friday review

On today's Friday review, we're going to look back at clips from some of this week's stories.


On Monday, we met some people involved in woodcutting. It's a popular sport in some parts of Australia.

Let's listen to David Foster, a world champion woodcutter.

DAVID Hi. My name's David Foster. I come from Tasmania. I've been woodchopping for thirty years and I'm here competing at this year's Royal Adelaide Show, which is one hundred years of woodcutting in South Australia, so it's a great little show.

Yes, well the one I just chopped in was the underhand event. We have five different disciplines here at the Show and the underhand is one of those. It's all based around our logging, what we did years ago. We used the axe and the cross cut saw to clear our countryside well over a hundred years ago so that's what the sport does today.

Well, my father was a world champion and my great uncle was a world champion as well so it's been in my family all my life.

I've won one hundred and eighty three world titles I suppose, the only person in sporting history to ever win over a thousand championships so I suppose it hasn't been too bad of a life.

I suppose everybody's got a gift and my gift was I could chop a bit of wood quicker than anybody else, and I'm most relieved to tell people that everybody has a gift and my gift has been woodcutting so I've been blessed.

In my heyday I used to practice a lot. As I get older in life other things happen business-wise and stuff so yes, you've got to train. The more you put in the more you get out. A great saying is 'you're a lucky man', the harder I worked the luckier I got.

OK, let's go back and look more closely at David's story.

He's a woodcutter. His sport is woodcutting. David could also be called a woodchopper, and his sport woodchopping.

Listen to David start by introducing himself, where he comes from, and what he's doing.

Hi. My name's David Foster. I come from Tasmania. I've been woodchopping for thirty years and I'm here competing at this year's Royal Adelaide Show, which is one hundred years of woodcutting in South Australia, so it's a great little show.

What's his name? His name is David Foster.

Where does he come from? He comes from Tasmania.

What is he doing? He's competing at the Royal Adelaide Show.

So that was a good, clear introduction. Let's hear David continue.

The one I just chopped in was the underhand event. We have five different disciplines here at the Show and the underhand is one of those. It's all based around our logging, what we did years ago. We used the axe and the cross cut saw to clear our countryside well over a hundred years ago so that's what the sport does today.

He talks a bit about the history of woodcutting.

He says it's all based around logging.

Logging is the activity of cutting down trees, so they can be used for wood.

Many parts of Australia were cleared, or had all the trees cut down, so the areas could be used for housing or farming.

He said they used the axe and the cross cut saw to clear the countryside over a hundred years ago.

An axe is a tool used to chop with.

A saw is a bit different. You use a saw by moving it back and forward, in a sawing motion like this.

So the land was cleared by hand, by people chopping down trees with axes and saws.

That's where the sport came from, that's the history of the sport of woodcutting.

Now listen to David talk about his own history of woodcutting.

Well, my father was a world champion and my great uncle was a world champion as well so it's been in my family all my life.

I've won one hundred and eighty three world titles I suppose, the only person in sporting history to ever win over a thousand championships so I suppose it hasn't been too bad of a life.

His father and uncle were both world champions, they were the best in the world at the sport of woodcutting.

David is the only person in sporting history to win over a thousand championships.

A champion is a winner; it's the person who has beaten all other competitors in a competition.

A championship is a high level competition to decide who is the best at something.

So David is the best woodcutter in the world, and one of the best champions in sporting history, in the history of sport.

I suppose everybody's got a gift and my gift was I could chop a bit of wood quicker than anybody else, and I'm most relieved to tell people that everybody has a gift and my gift has been woodcutting so I've been blessed.
David says everyone has a gift, and his was the he could chop a bit of wood quicker than anybody else.

A gift here means a talent, a special ability to do something.

David thinks he's been blessed, he's been very fortunate, to have this gift.

Woodcutting has made him very happy in his life.

Now let's hear David finish his story.

Oh yes, in my heyday I used to practice a lot. As I get older in life other things happen business-wise and stuff so yes, you've got to train. The more you put in the more you get out. A great saying is 'you're a lucky man', the harder I worked the luckier I got.

He says in his heyday he used to practice a lot.

In his heyday means during his best or most successful period. His heyday was the time when he was the best woodcutter he could be.

David says the more you put in, the more you get out.

That means that the harder you try and the more you practice something, the better you will be. And you'll get more rewards and benefits from it.

And David must certainly have very worked hard to achieve all those championships during his career.

OK. Now let's watch David's story one more time.

Hi. My name's David Foster. I come from Tasmania. I've been woodchopping for thirty years and I'm here competing at this year's Royal Adelaide Show, which is one hundred years of woodcutting in South Australia, so it's a great little show.

The one I just chopped in was the underhand event. We have five different disciplines here at the Show and the underhand is one of those. It's all based around our logging, what we did years ago. We used the axe and the cross cut saw to clear our countryside well over a hundred years ago so that's what the sport does today.

Well, my father was a world champion and my great uncle was a world champion as well so it's been in my family all my life.

I've won one hundred and eighty three world titles I suppose, the only person in sporting history to ever win over a thousand championships so I suppose it hasn't been too bad of a life.

I suppose everybody's got a gift and my gift was I could chop a bit of wood quicker than anybody else, and I'm most relieved to tell people that everybody has a gift and my gift has been woodcutting so I've been blessed.

In my heyday I used to practice a lot. As I get older in life other things happen business-wise and stuff so yes,
you've got to train. The more you put in the more you get out. A great saying is 'you're a lucky man', the harder I worked the luckier I got.

And that's all for today. You watch David's story again, and all the other stories from this week on our English Bites website.



multiple choice quiz
story spotlight
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English Bites - Friday review
story notes

 disciplines
 
A discipline is an area of study or a subject. We use the word discipline to talk about subject areas at university. For example the disciplines of science or arts. In this case, David uses the word ‘discipline’ to talk about the five types of events he competes in. They require different skills and have different rules.

 logging
 
Logging is the activity of cutting down trees for wood.

 countryside
 
Countryside refers to natural land outside cities.
 
spotlight

What does 'in my heyday' mean?

view the spotlight >
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