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Friday, 13 March  2009  Friday review

On our review English Bites this week, we look back at our week's stories.


Today we're going to visit a Jackaroo school, and an old airport that's closing down.

We're going to look at words that are related to these two places.

Let's start with the jackaroo school.

SEAN MURPHY: Egelabra Station runs more than 40,000 sheep and 3,000 cattle across 55,000 hectares of prime grazing country near Warren on the western plains of New South Wales. Throw in up to 10,000 hectares under cultivation and it's easy to see why the operation relies heavily on well-trained, reliable jackaroos.

GEOFF BASTION: Just hold your saw up at about that angle, full revs and let the saw drop into the log. Then we're going to get the spikes, or dogs, on the side of the saw to grip into the log.

SEAN MURPHY: Egelabra's success in training jackaroos owes much to its relationship with the Dubbo-based Western Institute of TAFE, which pioneered an on-farm training program here, featuring skills such as safe chainsaw operation, small mechanics, fencing, and livestock management.

GEOFF BASTION: We established this program about eight years ago and ran it as a pilot for one year, which was very successful and it has continued here at Egelabra ever since, but we've continued that with other major pastoral companies and merino studs across New South Wales.

So there were quite a few words there specific to life in the country.

Remember that a station is a very large farm, usually one that has sheep or cattle.

Listen to how large this farm is, and the sort of things they do there.

SEAN MURPHY: Egelabra Station runs more than 40,000 sheep and 3,000 cattle across 55,000 hectares of prime grazing country near Warren on the western plains of New South Wales. Throw in up to 10,000 hectares under cultivation and it's easy to see why the operation relies heavily on well-trained, reliable jackaroos.

It runs more than 40, 000 sheep and 3,000 cattle.

To run here means to keep, to have on it. The station has that many sheep and cattle living on it.

The station covers 55,000 hectares of prime grazing country.

Grazing country is land that can be used to keep sheep and cattle on.

This is prime grazing country, it's the best land for animal grazing.

To graze means to feed, usually on grass or other plants.

Apart from keeping sheep and cattle, 10,000 hectares are under cultivation.

If something is under cultivation, it has crops or plants growing on it.

To cultivate means to grow.

When the crops are ready, they're harvested. To harvest means to gather or collect crops.

So it's a busy station. Listen to what the jackaroos learn on the station.

SEAN MURPHY: Egelabra's success in training jackaroos owes much to its relationship with the Dubbo-based Western Institute of TAFE, which pioneered an on-farm training program here, featuring skills such as safe chainsaw operation, small mechanics, fencing, and livestock management.

The learn skills such as safe chainsaw operation, small mechanics, fencing and livestock management.

A chainsaw is a power-driven saw. On stations they often need chainsaws to cut down trees.

They learn small mechanics, or how to look after small, simple machines.

They learn fencing, how to put up and repair fences,

And they learn livestock management. Livestock are animals. The jackaroos learn how to look after the animals.

And of course they learn how to shear sheep.

OK. Now let's visit the old Adelaide airport, and then we'll talk about airport words.

PAT EMMETT: They say never speak ill of the dead so after years of bitching and bile, it is only fair that tonight we pay tribute to the tarmac that paid tribute to the State's most memorable moments. Never again will we be able to see visiting celebrities strut their stuff on the bitumen stage. Never again will we be able to secure a royal audience. And never again will we be able to walk on the ground touched by Pope John Paul II or any other Pope for that matter. Are you sad to see the old airport go or anything like that?

MALE: No.

MALE: We used to walk across the tarmac, that's great, won't be sorry to see the back of the revolving door.

PAT EMMETT: You won't get your shoes bronzed or anything because they are the last shoes to touch the tarmac?

FEMALE: No, I don't think so.

PAT EMMETT: You didn't get all teary coming across the tarmac?

MALE: Absolutely not. Lucky it's not raining, isn't it.

PAT EMMETT: As the last passengers filed into the increasingly forlorn terminal last night, waiting for her son was Janet Ayliffe who can remember the state of the art building opening almost half a century ago.

It was a time when people's front doors and cockpit doors were left unlocked when Janet and her brothers were allowed to ride with the pilot.

JANET AYLIFFE: We just loved it and we would lean out the window and wave to our grandmother and it was very friendly and there was no worry about it being dangerous or except I think we were told not to lean on certain levers so...

We heard a lot of airport words there.

We heard them talk about the tarmac.

The tarmac is the material that roads are made out of. But when talking about airports, it's the area where planes are loaded and unloaded. In the old Adelaide airport, it was where passengers got on and off planes as well.

It's near the runway. The runway is the place where the planes land and take off.

They taxi to the tarmac. For a plane, to taxi means to move slowly on the ground.

Airports also have terminals. A terminal is an airport building where the passengers leave and arrive from.

In airports, you'll also find check-in areas - they're places where passengers report to the airline, to say that they've arrived, and to leave their luggage.

OK, let's watch a clip from the story. You'll hear some words relating to planes -like pilot, the person who flies the plane, and the cockpit, the place where the pilots sit to fly the plane.

PAT EMMETT: As the last passengers filed into the increasingly forlorn terminal last night, waiting for her son was Janet Ayliffe who can remember the state of the art building opening almost half a century ago.

It was a time when people's front doors and cockpit doors were left unlocked when Janet and her brothers were allowed to ride with the pilot.

JANET AYLIFFE: We just loved it and we would lean out the window and wave to our grandmother and it was very friendly and there was no worry about it being dangerous or except I think we were told not to lean on certain levers so...

And that's all for today.

You'll find all of this week's story, and of course much, much more, on our English Bites website.



multiple choice quiz
story spotlight
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English Bites - Friday review
story notes

station
A station is a large farm, one that has sheep or cattle.

throw in
add

Example: You should throw in a few more quotes to improve the essay.

jackaroos
Jackaroos are farm trainees, people who work helping out on farms.

Dubbo
Dubbo is a town in NSW.


TAFE
TAFE stands for Technical and Further Education. TAFE institutes are training colleges.

on-farm
on real working stations

ran
Ran is the past tense of the irregular verb run. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: run

grazing country
Grazing country is land that can be used to keep sheep and cattle on.

chainsaw
A chainsaw is a power-driven saw.

small mechanics
how to look after small, simple machines


fencing
how to put up and repair fences


livestock management
Livestock are animals and livestock management is looking after the animals


pay tribute
To pay tribute to something or someone is to show your respect and admiration.

Example: The war memorial pays tribute to the men who died in battle.
Click here for more idioms and common expressions.

paid
Here paid is the past tense of the irregular verb pay. Follow the link below to find out more and to listen to some examples.
more information: pay

strut their stuff
To strut your stuff is to proudly show off your ability at performing.

Example: The crowd enjoyed the Rolling Stones strutting their stuff.
Click here for more idioms and common expressions.

forlorn
Forlorn means abandoned, empty and alone.

terminal
A terminal is an airport building.


state of the art
State of the art means using all the latest technology. When this airport opened nearly 50 years ago, it was very modern and used all the best technology.

half a century ago
50 years ago
spotlight

Look at some airport terms.

view the spotlight >
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