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Friday, 17 March  2006  Friday review - -ive suffix

Today on Friday review we're going to look more closely at a suffix we talked about earlier in the week.


We're going to watch clips from the story on internet adverts, and the story on sleep science. They both contain many examples of the suffice -i-v-e, pronounced 'iv'.
First, here's a clip about why more companies are looking to the internet for their advertising opportunities.


JAMES PACKER, PBL: From an advertising perspective, in my view, the debate is no longer about whether the Internet works as an advertising medium, but rather how to get the most out of it.

ANDREW GEOGHEGAN: Of those Australian homes connected to the Internet, more than half do so with broadband. That is prompting advertisers to spend even more on display ads, featuring moving images and interactive graphics.

MARTIN HOFFMAN: They can now run video ads, they can run audio and other flash animation ads which are very attractive to them.

REX BRIGGS: There is absolutely a difference in terms of how we as consumers use the Internet media. Sometimes it's in an entertainment and news mode and in that case display advertising works, because we're borrowing the time and attention of the media.

ANDREW GEOGHEGAN: Rex Briggs measures media effectiveness. He estimates Internet ad placements are priced at about half the value they should be and that inflation will kick in as demand increases.

OK so that was about advertising on the internet. The speakers used a number of adjectives that ended in -i-v-e.

The suffix -i-v-e or iv turns verbs into adjectives.

These adjectives show ability or tendency to perform an action.

For example we have the verb to 'imagine', and the adjective 'imaginative', describing the ability to image things, to think up new ideas.

Listen to the clip again. See how many 'iv' adjectives you can hear.


JAMES PACKER, PBL: From an advertising perspective, in my view, the debate is no longer about whether the Internet works as an advertising medium, but rather how to get the most out of it.

ANDREW GEOGHEGAN: Of those Australian homes connected to the Internet, more than half do so with broadband. That is prompting advertisers to spend even more on display ads, featuring moving images and interactive graphics.

MARTIN HOFFMAN: They can now run video ads, they can run audio and other flash animation ads which are very attractive to them.

REX BRIGGS: There is absolutely a difference in terms of how we as consumers use the Internet media. Sometimes it's in an entertainment and news mode and in that case display advertising works, because we're borrowing the time and attention of the media.

ANDREW GEOGHEGAN: Rex Briggs measures media effectiveness. He estimates Internet ad placements are priced at about half the value they should be and that inflation will kick in as demand increases.

There were a number of 'iv' words. The first one was 'perspective'. Perspective means point of view. It's a noun. It doesn't follow the same pattern as the adjectives we are talking about today.

The other 'iv' words you might have heard were interactive, attractive, and effective.

If 2 things interact, they act on each other, they communicate with or react to each other.

The adjective 'interactive' means having the ability to communicate with or react to something. It is usually used to do with computers to describe a program that reacts to and interacts with the user.

To attract means to pull or draw someone's attention. Attractive the adjective means having the ability to attract someone or something, to be very pleasing.

To effect means to produce results, to make something come about.

Effective means having the ability to produce results.

OK. Now let's watch a clip from the story on sleep research. There are more 'iv' words here.


LUISA SACCOTELLI: How's this for a company slogan: wake up to sleep. Think it could catch on? Well, safe to say something is working for Resmed, a biotech company which is proof, if it were needed, that Australian inventions can make it big and globally. Founder, Professor Peter Farrell, never had any doubt.

PETER FARRELL: Personally, I tend to be a little competitive, not to a crazy extent. But I think also a fetish to deliver results. I think you just have to have a sense of urgency.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: We're in Sydney where Resmed founder, Professor Peter Farrell started out 15 years ago building up what is now a market-leading $2,600,000,000 company specialising in the treatment of sleep disorders.

PETER FARRELL: In business, if you like, as in life what counts is execution. So the three most important things in business are execution, execution and execution. Our technology is at the forefront. We get it and we're executing properly.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: There's been nothing snoozy about Resmed's awakening from academia into a company with a record 39 consecutive quarters of growth and profits of half a billion, all emanating from a single, strange idea from a professor at Sydney University.

He says he tends to be a bit competitive.

Compete is the verb. The adjective competitive describes someone who likes to compete.

Notice that the spelling of the verb can often change when the 'iv' suffix is added.

We have deceive and deceptive, defend and defensive, adhere and adhesive, submit and submissive.

And that's all for English Bites today.

For more on 'iv', or any other suffix, just go to our website. You'll find all this week's stories, words, language and more. And you can send us an email if you have any questions.



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English Bites - Friday review - -ive suffix
story notes

debate
argument

medium
Here, medium describes a platform or instrument for delivering something. The irregular plural is media. We can advertise on a range of media - television, radio, newspapers, cinema, or online.

get the most out of
To get the most out of something is to take advantage of it and use it to the best of its ability.

kick in
If something kicks in it begins to take effect.

Example: It takes a while for the pills to kick in.
more information: kick in

tend
Here, tends means is likely. Peter is likely to be competitive.

fetish
A fetish is a strong desire or obsession.

deliver results
achieve things

urgency
Urgency refers to a sense of speed and importance. The adjective is urgent.

execution
Execution refers to the way something is done. The execution of a plan is the way it is actually carried out, or put into action.

consecutive
Consecutive means in a row.

quarters
A quarter refers to three months.

emanating
coming from
spotlight

What's a suffix?

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