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Episode 10: Bar Course
Episode 10: Bar Course

Shobbie learns how to be a bar tender and goes to work in a pub.

Transcript
Today Shobbie learns how to be a bar tender and goes to work in a pub.
I want to do bar-tending. I want to learn how to make drinks, simply because it's one of those things you never learn back home. To come to a point where you can actually walk around with those plates, without having to be worried about dropping them or to know a wine off the top of your head, to know how to mix a drink or to know what a drink is made out of, that is what I'm looking forward to. Are you right with weight? Yes, yes.
She wants to know a wine 'off the top of her head'. To know something 'off the top of your head' is to know it instantly without having to think very hard. Next, listen for the past tense of think:
I didn't realise how hard it was actually going to be physically. I thought it would be mostly coordination but it isn't. The plates are actually very heavy and to not spill a drink actually requires a lot of coordination.
She 'thought' it would be mostly coordination - 'thought' is the past tense of think.
I am most nervous about the plate carrying because for the first time I meant to do six plates, tonight, as opposed to four and these are very heavy plates. So, I hope I don't drop anything.
Six plates 'as opposed to' four. You use the expression 'as opposed to' to contrast things. Listen again:
I am most nervous about the plate carrying because for the first time I meant to do six plates, tonight, as opposed to four and these are very heavy plates. This is the last part of my bar and waiting course. It involves a work placement and I was placed in the Boho Bar. I am very, very excited be this is work placement, this is real stuff and I hope I don't drop anything. So we've got duck curry and it's actually pretty spicy. It says mild but I tell people that it's actually got a bit of a bite so, you know, coz a lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's mild on the menu but it's too hot. I gotta eat some yoghurt.' Wimps!
She uses direct or quoted speech in an informal way. Instead of saying 'people say 'Oh it's mild on the menu but it's too hot.' she says 'people are like...':
... a lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's mild on the menu but it's too hot. I gotta eat some yoghurt.' Wimps! Yeah.
She also uses indirect or reported speech - 'I tell people that it's actually got a bit of a bite' as opposed to direct speech such as 'I said "it's actually got a bit of a bite"
I tell people that it's actually got a bit of a bite so, you know, coz a lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's mild on the menu but it's too hot. I gotta eat some yoghurt.' Wimps! Yeah.
Now let's watch Shobbie take an order:
And are you ready to order? Not quite. Not quite, just a couple more minutes. No problems, take your time. Thank you.
'Take your time' means to not hurry.
Hi and this is.?. Oh the raspberry's mine. This is yours, no problem. And yours. Great. Thank you. Enjoy yourselves. Are you ready to order? Yes. We are. Hit me!
'Hit me' just means 'tell me what you want'
Yeah, just the dessert. Go for it! Yep, just dessert today. There is a saying, 'Eat dessert first because you never know when you're gonna die.' That's right, hopefully not quite.. No, not right now but..
That's a more formal piece of direct speech: 'There is a saying 'eat dessert first because you never know when you're gunna die'. Listen again:
Hit me! I'd like to have Apple and Pear for lunch. Ooh. Yeah, just the dessert. Go for it! Yep, just dessert today.
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