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Episode 29: Ballooning
Episode 29: Ballooning

This story is about ballooning. First, listen for when Shaiful uses 'a' and 'an':

Transcript

I've never done this before and I believe this will be a nerve-wracking experience especially since I have a fear of heights. We're about an hour from Adelaide. Such a beautiful morning here.

A beautiful morning, a fear of heights, a nerve-wracking experience, an hour from Adelaide. Listen again:

I believe this will be a nerve-wracking experience especially since I have a fear of heights. We're about an hour from Adelaide. Such a beautiful morning here.

The rule for using 'a' or 'an' is that 'a' is used before words that start with a consonant sound - a nerve-wracking, a fear, a beautiful - and 'an' is used before words that begin with a vowel sound - an hour. Hour is spelled with a consonant at the beginning - 'h', but it is pronounced with a vowel sound - "our", so you say an hour, like this:

It is an hour flight so probably for the first few minutes or at least quarter of an hour I won't look down but I'll eventually get to that and hopefully I won't be scared of heights after that.
Lean back, lean back, lean back.
Lean back.

He won't look down - so where will he look?

Kay told us if you're scared of heights you don't look down, you look out. You look out and not down and your brain counteracts and it so amazed at taking in the views you're no longer scared of heights.

He'll look out - that's looking straight in front of you. Where else can you look?

I did mange to look down and actually I enjoyed the view. Couldn't say the same about looking up though. Looking up was still a bit scary but looking down was pretty fine.

The phrases 'Looking up' and 'looking down' can also be used to mean that things are going well or going badly. If things are looking up, they are improving. If they're looking down they are getting worse. Next, listen for the way he describes facing the challenge:

When I face a challenge I normally I expect the worst so that it can only get better I like to face the challenges head on so I can feel the full wrath of it so...whatever doesn't kill me makes me stronger.

He likes to face challenges 'head on' or directly. He uses a saying to express this another way - whatever doesn't kill me makes me stronger. Let's see what else makes him stronger:

So, going around in circles trying to find a good place to land that was pretty scary.
Yeah turned off Lesley heading down a little dirt road. You're heading straight for me through the trees if you look straight ahead through the trees. That's where we are. I'm not sure just which paddock you're going to end up in.
Ok just hold there. Is there any clearings where you are at all Bailly?
Kept looking at the gas tanks hoping that there is still fuel for the balloons but everything turned out well.

Everything turned out well - something that 'turns out' a particular way happens that way. So how did it turn out well?

Could we land on your property if need be?

Could we land on your property 'if need be'. 'If need be' means 'if we have to' or 'if it is necessary'. Listen again:

Could we land on your property if need be?
Well if you've gotta, go you've gotta go.

We'll finish with Shaiful using the expression 'no question about that', which means that he is certain about what he says:

I'm just so happy that I did it and I would do it again yeah no question about that.

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