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Episode 24: Crocodile Farm
Episode 24: Crocodile Farm
In this story, Akki visits a wildlife park. First, listen for what Akki is going to do there:
Transcript

Today I'm gonna do work experience at the Crocodile Farm and Adventure Park.

He's going to 'do work experience' - that means he's going to help out. Next, listen to the way he uses 'and':

There are crocodiles, koalas, wallabies and snakes and some of them are really dangerous but some of them are really cute and I'm really excited about meeting them.

He uses 'and' at the end of a list of animals - 'there are crocodiles, koalas, wallabies and snakes'. It's better to say this than 'there are crocodiles and koalas and wallabies and snakes'. Listen again. The 2 main ways of using 'and' are to link nouns - wallabies and snakes - or to link parts of sentences - ‘some of them are really cute and I’m really excited about meeting them’. Sometimes 'and' is used in idioms. Listen:

Cassowaries, um, that was the first, first thing I saw at the Crocodile Farm. Why don't we just go down there and feed them?
I mean, they might look beautiful and all that but they can - they do have the potential to be very dangerous.

'They might look beautiful and all that' 'And all that' means as well as other similar things. Listen again:

They might look beautiful and all that but they can - they do have the potential to be very dangerous.
What we've got here is 3 year old crocodiles
Mm, yep.
These are done for their skins and meat. Our crocodile skin here is considered one of the best leathers in the world.

Our crocodile skin is considered one of the best leathers in the world. - that’s the passive voice.┬áThe passive voice is the verb to be - in this case 'is' with a past participle, here, 'considered'; 'is considered'. Notice that the subject of the sentence is not doing the action, the considering:

Our crocodile skin here is considered one of the best leathers in the world.

Next, listen to the way the keeper responds to Akki joking:

This is the crocodile we gonna feed here, okay we got the chicken and you got the pole.
Pole, the chicken, string. Attach the string to the handle here and he'll follow chicken up into the air.
Oh but, maybe me and you and maybe we can wrestle with him.
Yeah, good on ya.
No, probably not, uh?

Good on ya. You can use ‘good on ya’ as an expression of approval or encouragement or, as here, as a way of acknowledging a joke. Now listen for another expression of approval:

Alright, I’m just going to give it to him right?
No, you’re going to lower it down. Down and now you move it up.
Oh, you’re right.
How ‘bout this?
Yep. Lower it a little bit. There we go.
Oh! Sorry. One more time, give me one more time.
Okay swing it around this way. You gotta swing up. There you go, look at that.

There you go. You'll often hear people say this as encouragement. Next, listen for an expression that means that you are joking:

You know, there's two things I'm really, really afraid of.
Yeah.
One is a snake and the other is my mum.
Oh, your mum.
Well, I'm just kidding about my mum.
She's not here today is she?
No, she's not here.

He's just kidding - he's joking or not telling the truth. Let's finish by seeing if the keeper is kidding about the snake:

And I'll just sneak behind over here.
Aaaah! Aaaaah!! Aaaaaugh!
Come here.
Huge! Oh hohoho. Ohhh, no, no, no, no. Wait, wait, wait, wait. It's big. No, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. Aaaaaahhh! Aaaaaagh.
Watch out the crocodile can jump sometimes.
There we go.
Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait! Oooh, oooooh. Ooooh. Wait, wait, wait, wait. It's not poisonous is it?
Uuuumm.. no.
It's actually kinda nice.
It is eh?

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