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Episode 11: Sovereign Hill
Episode 11: Sovereign Hill
In this story Selby visits Sovereign Hill, a reconstruction of a 19th century Australian gold mining town that attracted many Chinese.
Transcript
In this story Selby visits Sovereign Hill, a reconstruction of a 19th century Australian gold mining town that attracted many Chinese. First, listen to the guide use another word that means reconstruction:
And so Selby you're in the... in Sovereign Hill's re-creation of one of the Chinese camps that were set up in the mid-1850s.
Re-creation means the same as reconstruction. The town is a model built at the place where the Australian gold rush began. So what does the re-creation show us?
This tent over here depicts how new arrivals would have lived on the gold fields.
It 'depicts' or shows how new arrivals – people who have just arrived – would have lived. Notice that she says 'would have lived' instead of 'lived'. Listen again:
This tent over here depicts how new arrivals would have lived on the gold fields.
You use 'would have' and a past participle such as 'lived' for situations in the past that are in some sense not real. You could also use 'might' instead of 'would' to express the same thing and say “it's how new arrivals 'might have lived'.” Next, listen for another use of 'would':
So Selby, to get you into the feel of the 1850s let's go and get you into some 1850s costume. Would you like that?
Would you like that – you use would for polite questions. So does he like it?
So Selby, to get you into the feel of the 1850s let's go and get you into some 1850s costume. Would you like that?

Oh sure, I like it. It's interesting.

Good. Come this way.
He said 'it's interesting'. –ing forms such as interesting are often used as adjectives. But how else are they used?
Now, I'm getting on a coach and heading towards the pan for the gold.
He's 'getting' on a coach and 'heading' towards the 'pan for gold', the place where you try to find gold in the water. Getting and heading are the present continuous tense, which is the –ing form with the verb to be or am such as in I am or I'm. I'm getting on, I'm heading towards. You use the present continuous for an action happening now. Listen again:
Now, I'm getting on a coach and heading towards the pan for the gold.
Next, listen for the –ing form again:
I'm going to find some gold now.
I'm 'going to' find. 'Going to' is a phrase that means you intend to do something in the future. He's 'going to' find some gold. So does he?
I don't think I can find any gold. There seems just not.. no nugget here.
No nugget here – a nugget is a lump of gold. We'll finish with a re-creation of a nugget that would make Selby rich if it were real:
Ah hah! Here it is. I finally find it. You see the big piece of nugget here. It's worth millions of dollars.
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