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Episode 10: Sailing
Episode 10: Sailing
This story is about sailing on Sydney Harbour. We'll look at some useful expressions and when to use the present perfect tense.
Transcript
This story is about sailing on Sydney Harbour. We'll look at some useful expressions and when to use the present perfect tense.

First, listen to Nimit talking about what he is going to do:
Well, Sydney Harbour to me it's a beautiful place but never thought I'd sail, going on a sail. It's my first time so, yeah I have seen sailboats and quite a few times I've thought that I want to do this and now I'm getting to do it.
He said 'I have seen sailboats' and 'I've thought' - 'have seen' and 'have thought' are the present perfect tense. The present perfect tense combines 'have' with a past participle - in this case, seen and thought. You use it to talk about an unspecified time in the past. Listen again:
I have seen sailboats and quite a few times I've thought that I want to do this.
Now listen for the words used to describe getting on and being on a boat:
Is this the right boat?

This is it.

Cool.

How you doing?

Good thank you.

Come on board, just grab my hand as you step on.

Yep, cool.

Well guys, welcome aboard First Fish.
The words used to mean getting on a boat are 'come on board'. Once they have done that they are 'aboard' the boat. Listen again:
Come on board, just grab my hand as you step on.

Yep, cool.

Well guys, welcome aboard First Fish.
Next, listen for another expression with 'board':
So guys to mitigate the risk of falling overboard and certainly solve any problems if swimming is an issue, we have life jackets. So I just want to hand these out to everybody.
Falling overboard. That's getting off the boat when you don't want to. The life jackets 'mitigate' the risk of drowning, which means the life jackets lessen the chance of drowning. And what does he do with the life jackets?
So I just want to hand these out to everybody.
He hands them out. You 'hand out' the same thing to a group of people. So let's see Nimit sailing:
Are there any chance I'm going to run into that thing? No.

That thing?

Yeah.

There's a very low chance that you could possibly run into that thing.
To run into something is to crash into it or hit it. The captain - the person in charge of the boat - thinks it's not very likely he'll run into it. So what do you call people who work by sailing or driving boats?
I hear your dad's a sailor.

Yeah, he's a master mariner. He's been a captain for almost 23 years. He became a captain before I was born so

Wow.

it's been a while. That makes him a master I guess.

People whose job is sailing or navigation are called sailors or mariners. If you are in charge of the vessel you are the captain or master mariner. We'll finish with Nimit talking about his father and the expression 'one upmanship', which means showing that you are better than someone else:
So how would he feel knowing you're sailing a sailing yacht in Sydney

He actually doesn't know that I'm sailing. I'm waiting for him to see for himself. I'm quite sure he'll be proud because he knows it was always my dream to go around sailing so I'm finally doing it so let's just hope he's happy. And I got a bigger steering wheel than he has. Those big oil tankers, they just have a little dial and you just go click, click and the ship turns.

Well, I'm all into one upmanship. You got to get a photo of this and show it straight to him.

Yeah, yeah. I'd love to do that actually.
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