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Episode 15: Monopoly
Transcript
We'll look at the word champion, and what it means to use something up, and the word 'malarky'.
So we're here today for the Australian Monopoly championships. The first world championships were in the early seventies and since those days we've been sending an Australian champion to attend the world event. And in, actually in '82 we had an Australian champion win the world event so hopefully here today we'll find another champion and who'll be of that calibre who may take it out for Australia.
To take it out means to win it. Listen again:
Hopefully here today we'll find another champion who'll be of that calibre who may take it out for Australia.

And who won the world event?
And in, actually in '82 we had an Australian champion win the world event.
An Australian champion. The winner of an event is called a champion. Listen:
My name is Timothy Hors. I'm the Victorian champion.

My name is Christopher Harrison and I'm the New South Wales state champion at Monopoly.

Hi I'm Graham Mason. I'm the Western Australian Monopoly champion.

The name's Anthony. I'm the Queensland champion.
The contests that decide who the champion is are called championships:
My name's Alexander den O'shea. I'm from Adelaide representing South Australia in the Monopoly championships.
What else can you call a championship?
During tournament Monopoly we have a very strict set of rules.
You can also call a championship a tournament.

During tournament Monopoly we have a very strict set of rules.

Now listen for the word 'malarky':
A lot of people at home have their own home rules so like putting extra money under free parking. So here we actually have a very strict set of rules that say none of that malarky.

None of that malarky - malarky is another word for nonsense or silliness.

So here we actually have a very strict set of rules that say none of that malarky.

Now listen to what this contestant has to say about luck.

I think I may have won my first round table.

Hopefully I haven't used up all my luck in the first round.
He hopes he hasn't 'used up' his luck. If you use up something, you don't have any left. He wants to still have luck or good fortune for the next round.
Hopefully I haven't used up all my luck in the first round.
Listen to what this contestant has to say about luck:
Then my luck turned, I made a few good plays and yeah it was actually quite an easy walk home in the last 15 minutes but I had an incredible amount of luck.
His luck turned - instead of losing he started winning.

What would happen if his luck didn't turn?
It was a contest between 3 of us and yeah there was a good chance of me actually going out.
There was a chance of him 'going out'. Here, going out means losing. He would not be playing any more. The phrasal verb go out has several other meanings. To go out can refer to a fire that stops burning or a light no longer shining - 'Don't let the fire go out'. And things can go out of fashion - they are not popular anymore - 'Black never goes out of fashion'. But here go out means lose:
It was a contest between 3 of us and yeah there was a good chance of me going out
So we've seen that to use up is to finish, that malarky means nonsense and that champions win championships. We'll finish with the new Australian champion, who didn't use up all his luck in the first round:
So the final score's 1682 plays 9820 we have a champion.

Well done Neil.
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