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Episode 11: Lantern La Lumiere
Transcript
We'll look at the phrasal verbs 'break down' and 'blow up' as well as the expressions 'up the ante' and 'get a kick'.
The lantern is a unique public projection device I suppose it's like a big television screen but with huge pixels enormously colourful everything breaks down to little blocks so it's very difficult to design for it. You can't really do that realistic work on it, it has to be quite abstract.

The interesting thing I find with it is it's just a big colour field object it turns a building into an animation it turns it into a painting it's a huge amount of colour and energy coming of this off the walls of what was a car park.
He said 'everything breaks down to little blocks'. Here breaks down means separated into. A picture is made up of many square blocks and can be broken down into those blocks. Listen again:
The lantern is a unique public projection device I suppose it's like a big television screen but with huge pixels enormously colourful everything breaks down to little blocks so it's very difficult to design for it.
The phrasal verb 'break down' has other meanings. Things that stop working are said to 'break down'

The car broke down.

Remember that break is an irregular verb with this pattern:
The car broke down yesterday.
The car is still broken down.

Back to the story:
The two pieces that I was involved in were the invader and the Adelaideascopeaphere was the final name. Both pieces are pretty abstract one's sort of a Flash based project, animation type thing and the other's sort of a video experiment so with the Adelaideascopeaphere we sort of went for trying to pick the highlights of things that happen in Adelaide trying to like up the ante and make people see there's heaps of stuff going on here and then on a canvas like this just using the opportunity to create something in a large public space is just fantastic.
Up the ante. Up the ante means to increase the challenge. Creating the animation challenges or opposes the idea that nothing much happens in Adelaide . Listen:
So with the Adelaideascopeaphere we sort of went for trying to pick the highlights of things that happen in Adelaide trying to like up the ante and make people see there's heaps of stuff going on here.
Now listen for another phrasal verb, blown up:
The challenge was to produce something within the constraints of the canvas because despite its enormous size it's actually only 34 panels by 21 panels in it's x and y , in its scales, so you work on a very tiny image and then it gets blown up to the size of a multi-storey car park.
Here to blow up doesn't mean to destroy with an explosion, it means to make something larger.

Blow is another irregular verb:
They blew up the picture
The picture was blown up

Why are they blowing up pictures for a multi-storey car park?
I really hope people get a kick out of this and I really look forward to seeing the next wave of artists producing content for this wonderful canvas.
So people get a kick out of it. To get a kick out of something is to enjoy it.

So, we've seen that break down means to separate into, blow up can mean enlarge and that to 'up the ante' means to challenge.

We'll finish with one more expression, 'bring it on', which means let it happen:
We want to make Adelaide bright and a beacon in the world not just another town, so bring it on.
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